Obama Says America Not A Christian Nation – and I Guess The Pope is Not Catholic Either

Because this is just too good, funny and on the mark to pass up.

Doug Giles nails this one out of the park and hits the jawbone of an ass on the way out.

America’s Not a Christian Nation—and I’m a Fat Black Lesbian Who Hates Hunting

 

By Doug Giles

Townhall.com

Last week Obama told the planet on his Dixie Chick America Sucks Euro-Tour that ol’ bigheaded America is not and has never been a Christian nation. I believe he said that right after he bowed and curtsied to the Saudi King and told the French that the US has been stuck-up meanies to their jealous and ungrateful Euro-socialist cousins. Damn you, Yankee doodle dandies.

America’s not a Christian nation? Well, it’s not a Hindu, Buddhist, Muslim (yet) or Tai Chi nation. I know Barack is auguring for the USA to become an Obamanation, but heretofore from what I’ve read regarding our founders’ beliefs and original intent for this experiment in self-government, this Republic has a massive intentional Judeo-Christian bent to it and not a religiously neutral one. Stevie Wonder can see that.

Yep, our founding fathers liberally mixed our nation’s political cement with the rock-solid truths of the Judeo-Christian worldview. Christianity wasn’t the state’s declared religion, but our framers clearly stated that Christ and Moses were where this bad boy came from.

For example, Mr. President, consider this small little offering from a few of our founders regarding Jesus, Christianity and this archaic book called the Bible. Also, all you RINO wonks who want Christians and Christianity scrubbed from the GOP because you think we are ruining the party, you ought to read the following, as well. Christians are ruining the party? Puh-lease. Uh, we started the party, dillweeds. You’re the ones who’re whizzing on it.

For instance . . .

John Adams

You remember John, don’t ‘cha? He was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, a judge, diplomat, signer of the Bill of Rights, and second President of the United States. Yeah, that John Adams. He said the following:

“The general principles on which the fathers achieved independence were the general principles of Christianity. I will avow that I then believed, and now believe, that those general principles of Christianity are as eternal and immutable as the existence and attributes of God.”

I bet your gay communist PoliSci teacher at Light-a-Fart University never told you that, eh? Allow me to continue.

“The Christian religion is, above all the religions that ever prevailed or existed in ancient or modern times, the religion of wisdom, virtue, equity and humanity.” That’ll tick the UN off, now won’t it?

The above from Adams sounds kinda Christiany to me. Do you need another example? How about old JQA, John Quincy Adams, the sixth president of the US, diplomat, Secretary of State, US Senator, and US Representative.

“My hopes of a future life are all founded upon the Gospel of Christ and I cannot cavil or quibble away [evade or object to]. . . . the whole tenor of His conduct by which He sometimes positively asserted and at others countenances [permits] His disciples in asserting that He was God.”

I wonder if Chris Matthews, head Beavis on MSNBC, would’ve mocked him for his faith like he did Sarah Palin?

Quincy continues . . .

“The hope of a Christian is inseparable from his faith. Whoever believes in the Divine inspiration of the Holy Scriptures must hope that the religion of Jesus shall prevail throughout the earth. Never since the foundation of the world have the prospects of mankind been more encouraging to that hope than they appear to be at the present time. And may the associated distribution of the Bible proceed and prosper till the Lord shall have made ‘bare His holy arm in the eyes of all the nations, and all the ends of the earth shall see the salvation of our God’ [Isaiah 52:10].”

Hmm, do you think Kathleen Parker would have pooh-poohed old goofy John and his mixing of God and government if she were around back then? More from JQA . . .

“In the chain of human events, the birthday of the nation is indissolubly linked with the birthday of the Savior. The Declaration of Independence laid the cornerstone of human government upon the first precepts of Christianity.”

I’m so glad Adams didn’t read Cal Thomas’ book, Blinded by Might, because he might have never run for office.

Samuel Adams

Signer of the Declaration of Independence, “father of the American Revolution,” ratifier of the US Constitution, governor of Massachusetts, brewer of killer beer said the following . . .

“I conceive we cannot better express ourselves than by humbly supplicating the Supreme Ruler of the world . . . that the confusions that are and have been among the nations may be overruled by the promoting and speedily bringing in the holy and happy period when the kingdoms of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ may be everywhere established, and the people willingly bow to the scepter of Him who is the Prince of Peace.”

He also called on the state of Massachusetts to pray that . . .

• The peaceful and glorious reign of our Divine Redeemer may be known and enjoyed throughout the whole family of mankind.

• We may with one heart and voice humbly implore His gracious and free pardon through Jesus Christ, supplicating His Divine aid . . . [and] above all to cause the religion of Jesus Christ, in its true spirit, to spread far and wide till the whole earth shall be filled with His glory.

And lastly, for now, we have John Hancock, signer of the Declaration of Independence, president of Congress, Revolutionary general (you remember him, don’t ‘cha?) and governor of Massachusetts said the following, much to the secularists’ and wussy RINOs’ chagrin:

“Sensible of the importance of Christian piety and virtue to the order and happiness of a state, I cannot but earnestly commend to you every measure for their support and encouragement.”

He also called on the State of Massachusetts to pray . . .

“That with true contrition of heart we may confess our sins, resolve to forsake them, and implore the Divine forgiveness, through the merits and mediation of Jesus Christ, our Savior. . . . And finally to overrule all the commotions in the world to the spreading the true religion of our Lord Jesus Christ in its purity and power among all the people of the earth.”

That’s just a smattering of quotes from a few founders regarding Jesus, Christianity and the Bible. For more 411 than you can imagine or handle about the faith of our founding fathers, click here. Lastly, when the president, Newsweak and sycophantic RINOs try to diminish our Christian heritage and the vibrant role it plays in the life of our nation, I say we do the following:

1. Jack up our church attendance. They say Christianity is history in America? That’s too funny. BTW: Didn’t Freddy Nietzsche say God was dead and Christianity was crap also? Yeah, I’m pretty sure he did right before he went insane, and then God said Nietzsche’s dead. Go to church for righteous and rebellious reasons.

2. Vote BHO and all rancorous RINOs out of office. Yeah, it’s officially RINO season. Run RINOs.

3. Get loud and proud about God, Christ and the Christian worldview and don’t let any stupid and smarmy, sassy secularist shut you up.

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13 Comments

Filed under Chrisitan Viewpoint, Culture War, Obama Marxist Tyranny

13 responses to “Obama Says America Not A Christian Nation – and I Guess The Pope is Not Catholic Either

  1. Ed

    Right on. These people time and time again keep re-inventing history into their own image. They are *so* beneath contempt…

    Thanks for the article and the link.

  2. Willy

    Wow…after reading the tripe on this website I’m sure glad I converted to Buddhism.

  3. Well, yes the Pope is Catholic; but a more important question might be “do you think Roman Catholics are ‘Christian’”? If the answer is no, then there’s no possible way to term America a “Christian Nation.” The key Founders (Washington, J. Adams, Jefferson, Madison, Franklin, G. Morris and others) rejected or otherwise didn’t affirm original sin, the trinity, the incarnation, the atonement, regeneration, eternal damnation and infallibility of the Bible. Can you believe like this and still be a “Christian”? If the answer is no then the key Founders (the men who wrote America’s Founding documents) were not “Christians” and the political theology of the American Founding is NOT “Christianity.” Hence America is not a “Christian Nation.”

  4. invar

    Nice try Jon.

    There are many Christians who do not subscribe to the doctrines of original sin, the trinity, hell, etc., – but who consider Jesus Christ as God’s Son, perfect and given for sacrifice to become the Passover for mankind that men may be redeemed to the Father, and that Jesus was resurrected to Life – and lives in us through His Spirit, and that whosoever believes upon Him, will be saved from the penalty earned for sin – which is death.

    Those are the tenets that make a Christian, not whether or not popery or the pulpit or doctrines and traditions make a Christian which is what you are attempting to argue.

    I can stand with a Catholic, a Baptist, a methodist and a Seventh Day Adventist – and know we are all Christians because of whom we bow and revere and for the reasons why.

    Just as our Founders did.

    The Principles of Christianity – are what forged this nation and set the cornerstone of liberty.

    But of course now that we in our stupidity are rejecting Christianity and marginalizing it like you do – we are losing our liberty for the tyranny of the State – which will replace Christian principles of personal liberty as government becomes God, and Obama is lifted to savior.

    Which is inevitably what happens to every republic that abandons it’s foundations for the same kind of tripe you are pushing.

    Enjoy the fruits of what is coming by tearing down the Christian heritage and foundations of the country.

    They will be well earned when the misery and pain of an all-powerful state are finally felt by you.

  5. The key FFs believed Jesus, not God the Son, not 2nd person in the Trinity, a “savior” in the sense that he (not He) saved man thru his superior moral example. For those of them who believed in the resurrection, they thought this was God the Father doing for the most moral MAN (not God the Son) what He may one day do for all GOOD men, perhaps all men.

    The key FFs also elevated works over grace for salvation. As such all good men were “Christians” even if they didn’t consciously accept Christ.

    I’m not “trying” to pull anything over on you; rather I’m just informing you of the historical record.

    If you consider the above to qualify as “Christianity” I don’t have a dispute with you.

  6. invar

    The Founders’ writings overall, dispell your assertions as ignorance or an effort to push an untrue agenda.

  7. Yours is a claim that is not backed by the historical record; mine is.

  8. invar

    Well then, that simply makes you a liar then now doesn’t it?

    There are already entries in this blog – that document the Christianity of the Founders and the intents of the Founders for the Republic to remain a Christian nation.

    You have provided nothing but a baseless assertion that is patently false along the lines of those who claim George Washington was a homosexual advocate simply because they say so and claim they have the historical record on their side.

  9. We should let John Adams — if ever a man considered “conservative” for the Founding — speak for “mainstream” Founding thought.

    “An incarnate God!!! An eternal, self-existent, omnipresent omniscient Author of this stupendous Universe, suffering on a Cross!!! My Soul starts with horror, at the Idea, and it has stupified the Christian World. It has been the Source of almost all of the Corruptions of Christianity.”

    – John Adams to John Quincy Adams, March 28, 1816.

    “I believe with Justin Martyr, that all good men are Christians, and I believe there have been, and are, good men in all nations, sincere and conscientious.”

    – To Samuel Miller, July 8, 1820.

    Keep those in mind when you see other quotations from the FFs like:
    “But that from such Faith alone Salvation may be expected, appears to me to be neither a Christian Doctrine nor a reasonable one….Morality or Virtue is the End, Faith only a Means to obtain that End: And if the End be obtained, it is no matter by what Means.”

    – “Dialogue between Two Presbyterians,” April 10, 1735.

    Or:

    “[F]or no man, who is profligate in his morals, or a bad member of the civil community, can possibly be a true Christian, or a credit to his own religious society.

    “I desire you to accept my acknowledgments for your laudable endeavours to render men sober, honest, and good Citizens, and the obedient subjects of a lawful government.”

    – George Washington, Letter to General Assembly of Presbyterian Churches, May 1789.

  10. Invar,

    I said nothing of the kind re GW being a homosexual advocate. I have proven that YOU don’t understand the historical record and your quotes (when you manage to quote them accurately) are “non-sequiturs” — they DO NOT prove what you WANT them to.

  11. invar

    We should let John Adams — if ever a man considered “conservative” for the Founding — speak for “mainstream” Founding thought.

    Fine. Let’s do that. Let’s take your cherry-picked quotations compare with mine and see if Adams’ view of Christianity was indeed mainstream in the context you wish to frame it:

    “The general principles on which the fathers achieved independence were the general principles of Christianity. I will avow that I then believed, and now believe, that those general principles of Christianity are as eternal and immutable as the existence and attributes of God.” – John Adams to Thomas Jefferson on June 28, 1813

    “The Christian religion is, above all the religions that ever prevailed or existed in ancient or modern times, the religion of wisdom, virtue, equity and humanity.” - John Adams, Works, Vol. III, p. 421, diary entry for July 26, 1796.

    “Conclude not from all this that I have renounced the Christian religion, or that I agree with Dupuis in all his sentiments Far from it. I see in every page something to recommend Christianity in its purity, and something to discredit its corruption.” – John Adams, letter to Jefferson 1816

    “I hereby recommend accordingly, that Thursday, the twenty-fifth of April next, be observed throughout the United States of America as a day of solemn humiliation, fasting, and prayer; that the citizens on that day abstain, as far as may be, from their secular occupation, and devote the time to the sacred duties of religion, in public and in private; that they call to mind our numerous offenses against the most high God, confess them before Him with the sincerest penitence, implore His pardoning mercy, through the Great Mediator and Redeemer, for our past transgressions, and that through His Holy Spirit, we may be disposed and enabled to yield a more suitable obedience to His righteous requisitions in time to come; that He would interpose to arrest the progress of that impiety and licentiousness in principle and practice so offensive to Himself and so ruinous to mankind; that He would make us deeply sensible that “righteousness exalteth a nation, but sin is a reproach to any people” [Proverbs 14:34].
    – John Adams, “National Fast Day,” A COMPILATION OF THE MESSAGES AND PAPERS OF THE PRESIDENTS, 1:284-86

    Since you mention John Quincy Adams – whose Christianity was no doubt impresseed upon him from a young age by Abigail and his father – had these things to say:

    “My hopes of a future life are all founded upon the Gospel of Christ and I cannot cavil or quibble away . . . . the whole tenor of His conduct by which He sometimes positively asserted and at others countenances His disciples in asserting that He was God.” – John Quincy Adams to John Adams, January 3, 1817

    “In the chain of human events, the birthday of the nation is indissolubly linked with the birthday of the Savior. The Declaration of Independence laid the cornerstone of human government upon the first precepts of Christianity.” Speech July 4, 1837 at Newburyport.

    You make the same stupid mistake the rest of the agenda-pushing Secularists (as I used to be) make – and that is, taking quotes to bolster a false argument without taking the entirety of their writings into consideration as their true views of the faith.

    Adams and the Founders opposed Popery and Traditions grafted into the plain reading of the scriptures that contributed to the tyrannies of Europe for centuries under the guise of the church or the popes.

  12. Invar,

    I am NOT a secularist. Rather I am someone who wants to properly SET THE RECORD STRAIGHT Re the American Founding. The problem as you have demonstrated in your last post is that you DON’T understand what John Adams MEANT when he invoked “Christianity” as the foundation for American govt.

    Since you quoted Adams’ June 28, 1813, “general principles of Christianity” letter to Jefferson, let us look further into the context to see what Adams really meant. You will see the “Christianity” to which he referred was not what YOU understand as “Christianity,” but some “other” theological system (not unlike like Mormonism which does the same thing, uses terms that Christians find familar but means something else).

    Who composed that army of fine young fellows that was then before my eyes? There were among them Roman Catholics, English Episcopalians, Scotch and American Presbyterians, Methodists, Moravians, Anabaptists, German Lutherans, German Calvinists, Universalists, Arians, Priestleyans, Socinians, Independents, Congregationalists, Horse Protestants, and House Protestants,2 Deists and Atheists, and Protestants “qui ne croyent rien.” Very few, however, of several of these species; nevertheless, all educated in the general principles of Christianity, and the general principles of English and American liberty.”

    http://tinyurl.com/ccjvb2

    Do you see that? “Arians, Priestleyans, Socinians” were all theological unitarians (J. Adams himself was a “Priestleyan” unitarian). But Adams goes beyond that. He also claims “Deists and Atheists, and Protestants ‘qui ne croyent rien’ [Protestants who believe in nothing]” are also part of that lowest common denominator of “general principles of Christianity.”

    This clearly equates with the above understanding of “civil Christianity” that I quoted from Adams in his letter to Samuel Miller, July 8, 1820, where he noted all good men are “Christians.” THAT was his test for “Christianity.” Is THAT how YOU define “Christianity”?

    My time and your space is limited here, but if you’d like, I will also quote how Adams had misgivings about his Thanksgiving proclamation that you reproduced precisely because it made him sound like an orthodox Trinitarian Christian (which he wasn’t) and that the US civil govt. was founded on such system (which it wasn’t).

    His quotation is available upon request.

  13. Floyd

    Too much over thinking…This nation was founded under God…There is only one God…None before Him None after…Therefore instead of the endless debate about who is right…Let us lift up God share Christ and turn this nation back around…But to quote one more recent President Ronald Regan…”When we are no longer a nation under God we will be a nation turned upside down.” Where are we now??? Our nation needs our prayers!

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